A blog to keep current on MPIRG'S fight for social and environmental justice.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Why is Voter I.D. a bad idea?

Voting is our right!

Democracy only works when everyone is involved. Any restrictions or barriers that decrease participation and limit our ability to exercise the most basic right in our democracy are an attack on the founding principles of our country.


Voter ID would make it hard for many people to vote!

Consider that voters who are least likely to have ID also are more likely to experience barriers that would prevent them from getting an ID, including senior citizens, low income communities, communities of color, and STUDENTS!

Whether their address doesn’t stay consistent, they cannot make it to a DMV or they cannot afford to pay, this new ID would prevent thousands of Minnesotans from being able to cast their ballot.


MN has the highest turnout nationally!

Our state is a model for how to hold elections, and our current election laws – like same-day registration – allow voters to easily exercise their right to vote. Why would we change the best system in our nation?


Voter ID would end absentee voting & same day registration as we know it!

If voters are required to show their voter ID at their polling location, voters out of state, like those serving in the military abroad, are among those who would be unable to participate in elections. Same-day registration vouchers would also be out of luck.


Voter ID does not fix ‘voter fraud’ anyway!

Proponents say this ID is the solution to voter fraud. However, the ID would only prevent voter impersonation – a crime for which NO ONE has ever been convicted in MN. This ID would not ensure a decrease in the limited cases of fraud that have occurred. Instead, it guarantees thousands of voters will face hurdles that may deter them from participating on Election Day.


The video below, produced by Campus Progress, details the effect of Voter ID legislation in other states.

video


Written by Tom Raley, MPIRG Campus Organizer

video by Campus Progress

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